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February 17 2014

18:29
Tags: Art Strange
07:37

January 14 2014

01:59

Time traveling photographer adds herself into her childhood pictures

Time traveling photographer adds herself into her childhood pictures

Time traveling photographer adds herself into her childhood pictures

Time traveling photographer adds herself into her childhood pictures

Genius. Photographer Chino Otsuka has discovered the art of time travel. Instead of exploiting a whole in the Space-time continuum to time travel, she simply digitally spliced her adult self into old photographs from her childhood. That way it looked like adult version of Otsuka was meeting child version of Otsuka. So clever.Otsuka explains the thought process behind her excellent photo series Imagine Finding Me: “The digital process becomes a tool, almost like a time machine, as I’m embarking on the journey to where I once belonged and at the same time becoming a tourist in my own history.”Sometimes she mimics what she did as a kid, other times she’s simply crossing paths with her childhood self and there’s even a few pictures where it looks like she’s taking care of her childhood self. It’s clever photo manipulation but a few of these shots really make it look like she was there the entire time.

via Time traveling photographer adds herself into her childhood pictures.

More at http://sploid.gizmodo.com/time-traveling-photographer-adds-herself-into-her-child-1499112549


Tags: Art

December 25 2013

11:30

The Best Scientific Visualizations of 2013

The Best Scientific Visualizations of 2013
Amidst the eye candy of popular science, not much attention is paid to figures accompanying articles in scientific journals and white papers. Even if they’re utilitarian and low-resolution, though — or perhaps because of that — these figures are a ...
    






December 04 2013

14:30

Visit National Parks on Other Planets With These Fantastic Posters

Visit National Parks on Other Planets With These Fantastic Posters
Come see the ice geysers of Enceladus, the searing volcanoes of Io, or the secluded canyons of Mars! The wonders of the solar system have never looked so wonderful. That’s the sense you get from looking at this brilliant collection of ...
    






November 19 2013

18:21

Quadruple Entendre ? I’ve got that beat: Xeno’s Sexdecuple Entendre

I was looking for examples of plays on words with as many meanings as possible and found this:

… it has been suggested that Shakespeare’s play Much Ado About Nothing used this ploy to present a surface level description of the play as well as a pun on the Elizabethan use of “nothing” as slang for vagina.

A triple entendre is a phrase that can be understood in any of three ways, such as in the cover of the 1981 Rush album Moving Pictures. The left side of the front cover shows a moving company carrying paintings out of a building. On the right side, people are shown crying because the pictures carried by the movers are emotionally “moving”. Finally, the back cover features a film crew making a “moving picture” of the whole scene.

Since “moving” can also mean selling (as in moving the merchandise) and since albums are often referenced by a single word in their title (for brevity), the bands use of an appealing multiple-entendre cover could be said to be for the purpose of “moving Pictures” – and as such be a quadruple entrendre.

20131118-211148.jpg

As a songwriter, though not rap, I too seek the lyrical white whale:

The quadruple entendre is the white whale of rap. For lyrically mined hip-hop heads, there’s no greater feat a rapper can accomplish. Some say Eminem successfully employed the much vaunted figure of speech on “Fast Lane”. Others say Kanye did so on “Blame Game”. It’s a contentious issue that impassioned heads debate endlessly in forums and comment sections, due much impart to the inherent difficulty (some would say impossibility) of imbibing a turn of phrase with such a multifaceted meaning. But it’s that very difficulty, the challenge of accomplishing the impossible, that makes it so appealing to MCs (and listeners) seeking transcendence through technique. …

http://www.liveforthefunk.com/spreads/post/unearthed-mike-gao-quadruple-entendre/

Being a mad genius I now throw my hat in the ring. Are you ready for… Yes, Xeno’s sexdecuple entendre! Holy cow! Ready? No kidding, sixteen different meanings:

our Mother is slipping away.

1) Mother’s in moccasins, out on the ice: our Mother is slipping away

2) The bride of my father’s not long for this life: our Mother is slipping away

3) The woman who birthed me is going cra-cra: our Mother is slipping away

4) An enemy of ours is making an escape: our Mother is slipping away

5) The orbit of the Earth is getting farther from the sun: our Mother is slipping away.

6) This planet, our home, is all but done: our Mother is slipping away

7) Fewer people now pray to Mother Mary: our Mother is slipping away

8) We will have another brother nine months from now: our Mother is slipping away

9) She does it alone, only she knows how: our Mother is slipping away.

10) She’s been cheating on him a couple times a week: our Mother is slipping away

11) Mama made a mistake, now get out of my day: our Mother is slipping, away!

12) Her first name’s “Slipping”, second’s “Away”: our Mother is Slipping Away.

13) The source of all life is getting harder to find: our Mother is Slipping Away

14) Protection by government is more unkind: our Mother is Slipping Away

15) the role of a woman is clearly being blurred: our Mother is Slipping Away

16) Whistler’s oil on canvas is fading I’ve heard: our Mother is slipping away

How many meanings did I fit into a phrase? Sixteen, at least. Word. I’m a beast.

Okay, to really cement this, the phrase must appear once in a context that makes all sixteen meanings clear at the same time.

CONTEST: Design me a safe-for-work print quality “Mother’s Slipping Away” CD cover I can use like Rush’s Moving Pictures and win $100. No deadline. Open till filled. All submissions become property of Xeno. Tell a design friend. Email: xeno735@yahoo.com

Rock out.


Tags: Art Mind

November 06 2013

11:30

Circle of Life: The Beautiful New Way to Visualize Biological Data

Circle of Life: The Beautiful New Way to Visualize Biological Data
When Martin Krzywinski took a systems administrator job at Canada's Michael Smith Genome Center, he didn't plan on becoming a pioneer of 21st century biological data visualization. Now his distinctive aesthetic is synonymous with the informational richness of our moment.
    






October 08 2013

15:45

Fanette Guilloud’s Art

The French artist and photographer paints geometric shapes onto abandoned walls, giving the three dimensional spaces the guise of two dimensionality when captured on film. The photos couple the surreal qualities of painting with the truth-telling promise of photography, depicting, in a single image, art’s ability to create the impossible.

“You can only see these paintings from the camera, that’s why they’re so interesting to conceive and shoot,” Guilloud wrote in an email to the Huffington Post. “Your brain has to adjust plans and perspective to conceive of a coherent photography.”

The resulting images remind us of modern day cave writings on the wall, as inscrutable as they are enchanting. …

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/07/fanette-guilloud_n_4024928.html


Tags: Art
10:30

Under the Microscope, Some Things Look Too Crazy to Be Real

Under the Microscope, Some Things Look Too Crazy to Be Real
Physicists wonder if there are other universes, but biologists have already found them. Just look through a microscope and there you are, in a different world of life.
    






September 26 2013

23:46

Ballet dancers’ brains adapt to stop them getting in a spin

Scientists have discovered differences in the brain structure of ballet dancers that may help them avoid feeling dizzy when they perform pirouettes. The research suggests that years of training can...

September 20 2013

17:30
A Giant Teddy Bear And Other Amazing Images From This Week

    






17:30
17:30

A Giant Teddy Bear And Other Amazing Images From This Week

Giant Teddy Bear

Iza Rutkowska thought up the giant teddy bear at the bottom of this photo as a sculpture that would be a little more cuddly than the traditional stone monuments in Warsaw, Poland. The giant toddler is behind the building, presumably.

Forms and Shapes Foundation via designboom

Plus a brain without wrinkles, art done in Microsoft Excel, and more



    






September 17 2013

21:30

Bullet Holes In Plexiglas Look Like Galaxies

"The Big Bang" photography series makes little bangs look cosmic.

Click here to enter the gallery

Deborah Bay found galaxies in bulletproof glass. The Houston-based photographer took pictures of bullet-proof Plexiglas from a police officer training school, after officers fired various bullets into it. At a rough glance, they look like stars, galaxies, and nebulae. Appropriately, Bay's collection is titled "The Big Bang" after the cosmic explosion theorized to be the start of the universe.

"The idea for the project developed after I saw a small display of projectiles that had been fired into bullet-proof Plexiglas (a demonstration of its effectiveness for personal safety)," Bay tells Popular Science. "The metal shards and trajectory lines demonstrated the huge amount of energy released when the bullets were blasted into hard plastic." The compositions are as beautiful as they are menacing. Gazing upon all those abstract cracks and wandering crevices, you can't help but think of how horrific they'd look in human flesh.

Bay's work can be found in the Cosmos exhibition at the New York Hall of Science in Queens, through March 2, 2014. More images from this fantastic series can be found at the photographers' own site.


    






21:30

Bullet Holes In Plexiglas Look Like Galaxies

A .44 Caliber Shot

Photograph, .44 Caliber in plexiglass.

Deborah Bay

"The Big Bang" photography series makes little bangs look cosmic.


Click here to enter the gallery

Deborah Bay found galaxies in bulletproof glass. The Houston-based photographer took pictures of bullet-proof Plexiglas from a police officer training school, after officers fired various bullets into it. At a rough glance, they look like stars, galaxies, and nebulae. Appropriately, Bay's collection is titled "The Big Bang" after the cosmic explosion theorized to be the start of the universe.

"The idea for the project developed after I saw a small display of projectiles that had been fired into bullet-proof plexiglas (a demonstration of its effectiveness for personal safety)," Bay tells Popular Science. "The metal shards and trajectory lines demonstrated the huge amount of energy released when the bullets were blasted into hard plastic." The compositions are as beautiful as they are menacing. Gazing upon all those abstract cracks and wandering crevices, you can't help but think of how horrific they'd look in human flesh.

Bay's work can be found in the Cosmos exhibition at the New York Hall of Science in Queens, through March 2, 2014. More images from this fantastic series can be found at the photographers' own site.


    






September 16 2013

19:30

A Galactic Spiral Of Early Nintendo Games [Infographic]

The Nebula of NES Games

Pop Chart Lab

More than 700 games from Nintendo's Golden Age, in one very nice-looking image.

From 1984 to 1993, during the heyday of the Nintendo Entertainment System, more than 700 games were released for the console--and many, many of them are classics, from M.U.L.E. to Prince Of Persia to Ice Climber. The excellent designers at Pop Chart Lab, who previously created this infographic of game controllers, has now mapped all of the games from that period in one handy chart.

The infographic starts at the center, with mid-'80s games like the original Mario Bros., and spirals out from there to early '90s games. There are multiples spirals, and they're color-coded by genre: purple, for example, represents entries in the "sports" genre, while gray represents "puzzle/racing/driving" games. That means you can monitor the evolution of NES games, to some extent: Donkey Kong came before Metroid which came before Mega Man--ad nauseum.

Just as interesting as Nintendo's crown jewels, though, are the games that were released and never made much of a dent in gaming culture: for every Zelda, there are several more Kid Kools.

You can purchase a print of the infographic for $32 over at Pop Chart Lab's site.



    






14:45

This Insanely Complex 3-D Printed Room Will Make Your Jaw Drop

It's printed from sand, it has a quarter billion facets, and it's also a wee bit terrifying.

This room, conceived and created by architects Michael Hansmeyer and Benjamin Dillenburger, might not be the world's first 3-D printed structure. But the design, which they call Digital Grotesque, is almost definitely the most ambitious: computer algorithms designed the 3.2-meter-tall, 16-square-meter room, which has a whopping 260 million (!) surfaces. And instead of being made of plastic (3-D printing's go-to material), it's printed from sand. Plus, it looks incredible--much more like a real-life, human-built room than any other 3-D printed structure, albeit one that's half Roman temple, half H.R. Giger nightmare.

"We think it's the world's first 3-D printed room," Hansmeyer tells us in an email, "in the sense that it's fully structural and has a complex surface, it's self-supporting, and it's massive (11 tons)."

To create Digital Grotesque, Hansmeyer and Dillenburger first relinquished some control of the project to math. The duo used algorithms to let computers randomly design the room, which was printed in Zurich. (The team designed an overarching model, but many of the details are the work of algorithms.) With a digital version of the room in hand, they used sand as the material, along with a binding agent, to print large chunks of the room--up to 4 meters tall by 1 meter wide by 2 meters deep. After that, they assembled the room piece by piece from the sandstone material. The entire process took one year to design, one month to print, and one day to assemble.

No, nobody will be living in it--the structure's more art project than studio apartment. If you don't mind some art-speak, this is the architects' explanation: "In the Digital Grotesque project, we use these algorithms to create a form that appears at once synthetic and organic. The design process thus strikes a delicate balance between the expected and the unexpected, between control and relinquishment." But, hey, maybe we can look forward to our own robot-designed sand castles one day.


    






September 13 2013

19:14

Hoodies Carved From Marble And Other Amazing Images From This Week

Marble Clothing

This comfy-looking sweatshirt is actually carved from marble by artist Alex Seton.

Alex Seton via PSFK

Plus photographs of fad diets, Russian "skywalkers," and more



    






19:14
15:50

X-ray ‘fingerprint’ points to Van Gogh

A bit of high-tech sleuthing has made the connection between a painting once thought to be a fake Vincent Van Gogh and a famous work that hangs in the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston (MFAH).

Don H. Johnson, professor emeritus of electrical and computer engineering at Rice University, performed statistical analysis of X-ray images of the canvas behind the previously unknown painting “Sunset at Montmajour.”

His research helped experts at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam authenticate the work.

Declared a fake,

Declared a fake, “Montmajour” was banished to an attic until 1970. The current owners brought it to the Van Gogh Museum in 1991, and at that time the museum’s experts doubted its authenticity—a decision they now describe as “a painful admission.” (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

“I pointed out the very close, but not exact, relationship of this painting’s canvas to the canvas of the only Van Gogh in the MFAH,” Johnson says. “Apparently, this pointed them in the direction of examining the Houston painting for a more detailed comparison.”

The painting’s canvas was a match for the MFAH’s “The Rocks.”

Johnson completed his work for the Van Gogh Museum more than a year ago and filed a report on his findings. The museum followed up by sending forensic investigators to Houston for a close look at “The Rocks” to see what other characteristics were in alignment.

The Van Gogh Museum unveiled its latest findings, along with the painting itself, in Amsterdam on Sept. 9.

“I got an email very early that morning, addressed to ‘friends and colleagues’ of the museum, to say they were about to hold a press conference to unveil the painting,” Johnson says. “Then the story appeared in the New York Times and everywhere else a few hours later and the phone started ringing.”

Johnson says he and a collaborator at the University of Arizona are the only researchers performing forensic investigations of canvas that can be seen in detail only through X-rays.

Same bolt of canvas

“When the masters prepared a canvas for painting, they would cut it from the roll, attach it to a stretcher and paint their work. For such a famous artist as Van Gogh, conservators would glue on a backing canvas to preserve the original. Consequently, we can’t simply take it out of the frame and have a look at the original canvas,” he says. “And we certainly can’t take paint off the front.”

Johnson uses a signal-processing algorithm that automatically analyzes the thread density in X-rayed canvases to reveal previously unavailable details about the materials of the masters. The process creates what amounts to a canvas “fingerprint.”

The software lets Johnson see how loosely or tightly a canvas is woven. That lets him create a map of the weaving variation pattern that can be compared to see how paintings may be related.

While the weaving patterns revealed for “Sunset at Montmajour” and “The Rocks” don’t line up perfectly, they are without doubt from the same bolt of fabric, likely one Van Gogh had sent to him by his brother Theo in Paris, Johnson says. Although Van Gogh was poor, he was particular about his materials.

The unsigned ‘Montmajour” is privately owned and from what the Van Gogh Museum considers to be the artist’s most productive period, during his time in Arles in 1888 and before his grip on sanity began to slip. He died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound in 1890.

Museum officials say the painting was left to Theo upon Vincent’s death. Theo’s widow sold it to a Paris art dealer who subsequently sold it to a Norwegian collector in 1908.

Declared a fake, “Montmajour” was banished to an attic until 1970. The current owners brought it to the Van Gogh Museum in 1991, and at that time the museum’s experts doubted its authenticity—a decision they now describe as “a painful admission.” But when the family returned two years ago, the museum decided to make use of new technology to have another look.

The painting does not seem to be one of Vincent Van Gogh’s personal favorites. In a letter to Theo that experts once thought referred to “The Rocks” (but now know better), he described the scene as having “a charming nobility . . . You wouldn’t have been at all surprised to see knights and ladies suddenly appear, returning from hunting with hawks, or to hear the voice of an old Provencal troubadour,” he wrote, adding the painting “was well below what I’d wished to do.”

That doesn’t lessen Johnson’s desire to form his own opinion, he says. “I’ve seen the X-ray, but I’d really like to see the painting itself.”

Source: Rice University

The post X-ray ‘fingerprint’ points to Van Gogh appeared first on Futurity.

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