Tumblelog by Soup.io
Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

March 31 2020

09:16

New Trump mileage standards to gut Obama climate effort

President Donald Trump is poised to roll back ambitious Obama-era vehicle mileage standards and raise the ceiling on damaging fossil fuel emissions for years to come, gutting one of the United States' biggest efforts against climate change.
07:59

Unravelling the mystery of black holes: Scientists release stellar code to the public

Today, team COMPAS (Compact Object Mergers: Population Astrophysics and Statistics) has announced the first public beta release of their rapid binary population synthesis code (available for download here).
07:53

Scientists record first reported heatwave at Antarctica's Casey research station

This summer, while drought, heatwaves and bushfires ravaged Australia, Antarctica was also experiencing a summer of extreme weather.
07:50

New method predicts which black holes escape their galaxies

Shoot a rifle, and the recoil might knock you backward. Merge two black holes in a binary system, and the loss of momentum gives a similar recoil—a "kick"—to the merged black hole.
07:44

A new tool for controlling reactions in microrobots and microreactors

In a new paper, Thomas Russell and postdoctoral fellow Ganhua Xie, at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, report that they have used capillary forces to develop a simple method for producing self-assembling hanging droplets of an aqueous polymer solution from the surface of a second aqueous polymer solution in well-ordered arrays.
07:42

New explanation for sudden collapses of heat in plasmas can help create fusion energy on Earth

Scientists seeking to bring the fusion that powers the sun and stars to Earth must deal with sawtooth instabilities—up-and-down swings in the central pressure and temperature of the plasma that fuels fusion reactions, similar to the serrated blades of a saw. If these swings are large enough, they can lead to the sudden collapse of the entire discharge of the plasma. Such swings were first observed in 1974 and have so far eluded a widely accepted theory that explains experimental observations.
07:41

Researchers investigate how forests are changing in response to global warming

As the climate is changing, so too are the world's forests. From the misty redwoods in the west to the Blue Ridge forest of Appalachia, many sylvan ecosystems are adapting to drier conditions.
07:37

Sophisticatedly engineered 'watercourts' stored live fish, fueling Florida's Calusa kingdom

The mighty Calusa ruled South Florida for centuries, wielding military power, trading and collecting tribute along routes that sprawled hundreds of miles, creating shell islands, erecting enormous buildings and dredging canals wider than some highways. Unlike the Aztecs, Maya and Inca, who built their empires with the help of agriculture, the Calusa kingdom was founded on fishing.
07:23

New pathogen threatens fennel yield in Italy

A new fennel fungal disease caused by a new genus and species—Ochraceocephala foeniculi, was observed for the first time in 2017 on 5% of the "Apollo" fennel cultivar grown in the sampled localities in Catania province, Italy. Now, it has spread to 2 more cultivars: "Narciso" and "Pompeo", causing crop losses of around 20-30%. The new pathogen damages the fennel with necrotic lesions on the crown, root and stem.
07:20

Water pressure: Ancient aquatic crocs evolved, enlarged to avoid freezing

Taking the evolutionary plunge into water and abandoning land for good, as some crocodilian ancestors did nearly 200 million years ago, is often framed as choosing freedom: from gravity, from territorial boundaries, from dietary constraints.
07:13

Untangling the social lives of spiders

The idea of a complex spider society—in which thousands of spiders live, hunt, and raise their young together in a single colony—is unsettling to many of us. We are perhaps lucky then that this scene is relatively rare among arachnids. Among the 40,000 known species of spiders, the vast majority live solitary lives and will often show aggression toward other spiders they encounter, even within their own species. There are fewer than 25 known species of social spiders, distributed broadly across 6 different families and 9 different genera. Not only do these spiders live in social groups, but they produce populations that grow over time as new offspring are added to the nest, enabling the capture of increasingly large prey as the colony expands, and even give rise to new daughter colonies. As social creatures ourselves, humans have long been interested in the evolutionary innovations that enable social cooperation. In a new article in Genome Biology and Evolution titled "Comparative genomics identifies putative signatures of sociality in spiders", researchers provide one of the first glimpses into the genetic underpinnings for how a solitary spider evolves into a social one.
07:05

Physicists weigh in on the origin of heavy elements

A long-held mystery in the field of nuclear physics is why the universe is composed of the specific materials we see around us. In other words, why is it made of "this" stuff and not other stuff?
00:32

Blood test detects over 50 types of cancer, some before symptoms appear

In a study involving thousands of participants, a new blood test detected more than 50 types of cancer as well as their location within the body with a high degree of accuracy, according to an international team of researchers.
00:01

Blood test shows promise for detecting the deadliest cancers early

A blood test developed and checked using blood samples from 4000 people can accurately detect more than 50 cancer types

March 30 2020

23:59

Pluto formed quickly with a deep ocean covering its entire surface

Pluto’s ancient oceans may have come about just after the icy world was born, melting from ice in a process that suggests the dwarf planet took just 30,000 years to form
22:16

Weighing in on the origin of heavy elements

Nuclear physicists conducted a physics experiment that utilizes novel techniques to study the nature and origin of heavy elements in the universe.
22:00
Uranus blasted a gas bubble 22,000 times bigger than Earth
21:41

Is Ozone Why Lightning Causes Headaches for Some?

Years ago, you may have heard that lights, lighting, such as flickering office lights, can cause headaches, but so can lightning. That’s lightning, the flashes of light in the sky. How could lightning that people don’t even see cause headaches on the ground? We had posted this study years ago...

The post Is Ozone Why Lightning Causes Headaches for Some? appeared first on True Strange News.

20:00
Scientists are experimenting with three kinds of COVID-19 vaccines
19:56

Tiny optical cavity could make quantum networks possible

Engineers at Caltech have shown that atoms in optical cavities—tiny boxes for light—could be foundational to the creation of a quantum internet. Their work was published on March 30 by the journal Nature.
Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.
Get rid of the ads (sfw)

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl