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September 11 2013

21:35

NATO Tests Electromagnetic Beam To Stop Suicide Bombers

The non-lethal weapon stops vehicles by turning off their engines.

NATO is developing a device that stops suicide bombers' vehicles before they can reach their targets. In a video released today, NATO researchers in Norway demonstrate the effectiveness of the weapon against cars, a jet ski, and a drone.

The high-intensity electromagnetic beam stops a vehicle by interfering with its controls and turning off its engine. In the video above, you can see the beam halt an approaching car in a simulation of a military checkpoint. In another test, the beam-emitting device is mounted inside the back of a vehicle, and stops another car approaching from behind.

The electromagnetic beam also works against remotely detonated bombs, by jamming radio signals.

Testing is set to conclude in 2014, so much of the information about this technology remains unknown. Still, at least one challenge for the final weapon is apparent. Every demonstration in the video involves a clear target. Turning off the wrong car engine could cause problems like traffic accidents, endangering civilians.

Still, a misfired engine-stopping beam is a lot better than past approaches to cars speeding through checkpoints, which required soldiers to make split-second judgments about whether or not to fire on a potentially explosive car speeding towards them.


    






21:35

NATO Tests Electromagnetic Beam To Stop Suicide Bombers

The non-lethal weapon stops vehicles by turning off their engines.


NATO is developing a device that stops suicide bombers' vehicles before they can reach their targets. In a video released today, NATO researchers in Norway demonstrate the effectiveness of the weapon against cars, a jet ski, and a drone.

The high-intensity electromagnetic beam stops a vehicle by interfering with its controls and turning off its engine. In the video above, you can see the beam halt an approaching car in a simulation of a military checkpoint. In another test, the beam-emitting device is mounted inside the back of a vehicle, and stops another car approaching from behind.

The electromagnetic beam also works against remotely detonated bombs, by jamming radio signals.

Testing is set to conclude in 2014, so much of the information about this technology remains unknown. Still, at least one challenge for the final weapon is apparent. Every demonstration in the video involves a clear target. Turning off the wrong car engine could cause problems like traffic accidents, endangering civilians.

Still, a misfired engine-stopping beam is a lot better than past approaches to cars speeding through checkpoints, which required soldiers to make split-second judgments about whether or not to fire on a potentially explosive car speeding towards them.


    






June 09 2011

14:01

Red Team Go! It's NATO's Turn to Build a Cyber Defense Force

NATO HQ USAF

Hacks, cyber strategies, international cyber squads--we could just go ahead and dub this the "summer of cyber," and it's not even mid-June. On the heels of some high-profile hacks (including one at Lockheed Martin), a terse exchange between Google and China following a Gmail breach, and the U.S. DoD declaring that cyber attacks can be considered an act of war, NATO has now said it will develop a special cyber force.

It's even getting a cool name: the "Cyber Red Team." But the urgency that name implies might not carry over to the force's actual functions. For the most part, it sounds like the Red Team would simulate threats to manage readiness and response, probe networks for potential security vulnerabilities, assess the damage of cyber attacks against member states, and carry out the occasional denial of service attack.

In other words, it sounds like Cyber Team Red will be a fast reactive force rather than a proactive force meting out cyber punishment to nations that step out of cyber-line. Still, given the difficulty in identifying and prosecuting cyber crimes across international borders, such an international cyber force could go a long way toward enforcing international law/agreements and protecting states that don't have the resources to mount their own cyber defenses.

[PhysOrg]

14:01

Red Team Go! It's NATO's Turn to Build a Cyber Defense Force

Hacks, cyber strategies, international cyber squads--we could just go ahead and dub this the “summer of cyber,” and it’s not even mid-June. On the heels of some high-profile hacks (including one at Lockheed Martin), a terse exchange between Google and China following a Gmail breach, and the U.S. DoD declaring that cyber attacks can be considered an act of war, NATO has now said it will develop a special cyber force.

It’s even getting a cool name: the “Cyber Red Team.” But the urgency that name implies might not carry over to the force’s actual functions. For the most part, it sounds like the Red Team would simulate threats to manage readiness and response, probe networks for potential security vulnerabilities, assess the damage of cyber attacks against member states, and carry out the occasional denial of service attack.

In other words, it sounds like Cyber Team Red will be a fast reactive force rather than a proactive force meting out cyber punishment to nations that step out of cyber-line. Still, given the difficulty in identifying and prosecuting cyber crimes across international borders, such an international cyber force could go a long way toward enforcing international law/agreements and protecting states that don’t have the resources to mount their own cyber defenses.

[PhysOrg]

Reposted by02mydafsoup-01 02mydafsoup-01

February 11 2011

19:10

Military alliances keep the peace

RICE (US) — Countries that enter into defense pacts with other nations are less likely to be attacked—and are not more likely to attack others. For the study, published in the journal Foreign Policy Analysis, researchers analyzed global defense agreements from 1816 to 2001. “We were interested in analyzing policy prescriptions that leaders of countries [...]

January 25 2010

18:51

Pentagon Tests Global Internet Routing Via Satellite

Communication satellites have traditionally acted as transfer points for data beamed up from the ground. But the first commercial satellite with its own Internet router could eliminate the usual satellite-relay transfer lag and more flexibly handle voice, video and data communications for U.S. and NATO military forces anywhere around the world. The U.S. Department of Defense plans to kick off a three-month demo of the space technology this week, according to Aviation Week's Ares Defense Blog.

Cisco recently conducted a successful test of the Internet Protocol Routing in Space (IRIS) payload, which launched aboard an Intelsat IS-14 satellite last November. Instead of requiring multiple bounces for users scattered around the globe, IRIS can reroute data between any ground users in a single satellite hop, without involving any extra ground stations or multiple satellite beams. It essentially forms the backbone of a network for mobile Internet access anywhere in the world.

The space Internet router also regenerates received signals and boosts them again for better data reception among end users, whether those users are U.S. Special Forces in the mountains of Afghanistan or NATO troops operating out of Kandahar.

The IRIS payload's router and modem can even get software upgrades from the ground and extend its useful life -- not a small consideration considering the expense of launching satellites. Perhaps IRIS could someday make use of NASA's more resilient Internet protocol designed for deep-space communications.

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